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Results for search "Kids' Ailments".

Health News Results - 468

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have found the genetic cause of a rare disorder that causes children to be born with deafness, blindness, albinism and fragile bones.

The syndrome is called COMMAD. It occurs when children inherit two mutations -- one from each parent -- of a gene called MITF. Each parent is also deaf due to another rare genetic disorde...

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents don't count on getting a same-day appointment with their child's doctor and turn to other health care options when their kids are suddenly sick, a new survey finds.

More than 2,000 parents of youngsters up to age 18 were surveyed in the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The parents were as...

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who get too much screen time may be more likely to have risk factors that increase their chances of type 2 diabetes, new research says.

Watching television, playing video games or sitting in front of a computer or other device for more than three hours each day was linked to more body fat and insulin resistance. Those factors mean the b...

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Higher folic acid levels during pregnancy may reduce the risk of high blood pressure in children if their mothers have heart disease risk factors, a new study suggests.

"Our study adds further evidence on the early life origins of high blood pressure," said senior corresponding author Dr. Xiaobin Wang, a pediatrician from Boston University...

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Professional pest management may not be needed to control asthma in kids with a mouse allergy, researchers say.

Mice are a common cause of asthma flare-ups in low-income urban neighborhoods, according to prior research. In this new study, scientists found that teaching families how to reduce mice allergens on their own can help control childr...

TUESDAY, March 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A tax designed to reduce mid-city traffic in Stockholm, Sweden, was tied to a reduction in asthma attacks in children, a new study suggests.

"The key takeaways of this paper are that health gains can be realized through efforts to lower air pollution, and that we need to be patient in waiting for the complete picture to emerge," said study au...

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Survival rates for children who get kidney transplants have improved significantly over the last half-century, a new study finds.

"The outlook for infants and children with end-stage kidney disease was once dismal, with poor survival rates after transplant. There has been great progress in pediatric kidney transplan...

MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Obese girls may face a significantly higher risk for developing allergies, a new study suggests.

But the researchers found the opposite was true for obese boys: They may actually face a slightly diminished risk for asthma, food allergies and eczema when compared to normal-weight boys.

"We found a direct increase in the number of atop...

SUNDAY, March 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids and teens who suffer with migraines may find relief from a nasal "nerve block" that's commonly used in adults with the debilitating headaches, a new study suggests.

During the procedure, a catheter is placed in each nostril and inserted until it reaches a bundle of nerves at the back of the nose. At that point,...

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young children should be screened at least once for lazy eye before they turn 5 years old, a U.S. panel of experts says.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task (USPSTF) is still advising parents to have their kids screened at least once for lazy eye or its risk factors. Screening should be done when the children are between the ages of 3 and 5 yea...

FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A type of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection has increased 700 percent in American children since 2007, a new investigation reveals.

These infections are caused by Enterobacteriaceae bacteria -- normal bacteria that can become resistant to multiple drugs. Once confined to hospitals, the tough-to-treat infections are spreading into...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children are much more likely than adults to have a headache before an ischemic stroke, new research suggests.

An ischemic stroke is caused by a blocked blood vessel in the brain.

"Stroke should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child with a headache and additional symptoms of weakness or numbness in the face, arm, or l...

MONDAY, Feb. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Safe, healthy fun for kids with asthma may be as near as the neighborhood pool, one respiratory specialist says.

Staying active can be a challenge for the more than 6 million children with asthma in the United States, noted Dr. Tod Olin. He's a pediatric pulmonary specialist at National Jewish Health in Denver.

"It can be a dilemma f...

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Skipping surgery and treating appendicitis with antibiotics alone may be a safe approach for many children, a new analysis suggests.

Reviewing 10 studies on more than 400 young patients, researchers found that nonsurgical treatment for an inflamed appendix appeared effective overall. But, appendicitis recurred in 14 percent of patients, and th...

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children in families struggling to make ends meet are developing asthma and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at faster rates than kids from families with greater means, a new study finds.

On the other hand, kids from wealthier families are being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder more often than children in poorer homes. B...

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flu activity spiked sharply across the United States this week, federal health officials reported Friday.

Deaths from flu-related conditions continued at high levels, and hospitalizations among people over 65 and under the age of 4 are up. So far, 20 children have died from flu, said Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist for the U.S. Centers for...

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of air pollution may increase some Hispanic children's risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

"Exposure to heightened air pollution during childhood increases the risk for Hispanic children to become obese and, independent of that, to also develop type 2 diabetes," said study corresponding author Michael Goran. He is co-dir...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There are a number of ways parents can help give a boost to their child's immune system, a family doctor suggests.

"The immune system helps us fight infections," said Dr. Palak Shroff, a family medicine specialist at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.

"Immunity develops over time, so the more someone gets exposed, the m...

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment received in childhood to help fight cancer can have an impact on sexual health in adulthood, a new report suggests.

However, the study also found that most adult survivors of childhood cancer report having satisfying sexual and romantic lives.

"As positive as it is to see this, we still should be closely monitoring sexual h...

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder account for more than 6 million physician office visits a year in the United States, say U.S. health officials.

An average 6.1 million trips to a doctor, pediatrician or psychiatrist by children aged 4 to 17 in 2013 involved treatment for diagnosed ADHD, according to a report from the U.S....

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. pediatricians are taking President Donald Trump to task after he issued executive orders Wednesday that -- the doctors said -- will make the country a much less welcoming place for immigrant children.

Not only will refugee children be harmed by the new policies, but children of immigrants already living in the United States will become...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two infants with an advanced form of leukemia are in remission after treatment with genetically tweaked immune system cells, British researchers report.

Both babies had run out of treatment options for their cancer, known as B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL. But, after treatment with genetically altered T-cells -- a type of immun...

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in treating infants and children whose hearts suddenly stop beating, a new study suggests.

The study included 329 children, aged 2 days to 18 years, who suffered cardiac arrest in a hospital. Some had their body temperature maintained within normal range, while others had their ...

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- American parents don't always agree when to keep their children home sick from school, a new poll reveals.

The poll included almost 1,500 parents nationwide. All had at least one child aged 6 to 18. The research found that 75 percent had kept their child home sick from school at least once in the past year. The main reasons for keeping a child...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly all children get respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) by age 2. But just because the infection is common doesn't mean it should be taken lightly, one nursing specialist warns.

Symptoms of this lung and respiratory infection -- coughing, sneezing and a runny nose -- are often mistaken for a cold, according to Alison Pittman, clinical ass...

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rude parents can rattle medical staff enough to compromise the quality of care their critically ill child receives, a new study suggests.

Medical teams in a neonatal intensive care unit made worse decisions during simulated emergency scenarios if they had been treated rudely by an actress playing the role of an angry family member, the resear...

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis may be able to achieve relief without medications by eating a special diet, a small study suggests.

The diet includes non-processed foods, such as fruits, vegetables, meats and nuts. Over 12 weeks, the diet appeared to ease all signs of these inflammatory bowel diseases in eight of the 10 aff...

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take certain heartburn medications during pregnancy may have a child at increased risk of developing asthma, new research suggests.

For the new study, investigators analyzed eight studies that included more than 1.3 million children. The researchers found that kids born to mothers who were prescribed drugs for acid reflux during pregn...

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black children are about one-third more likely to die from kidney failure than white children, and access to kidney transplants may be a crucial factor explaining the discrepancy, a new study suggests.

Dr. Elaine Ku, of the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues tracked the health of more than 12,000 black, Hispanic and whi...

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take fish oil during their third trimester of pregnancy might cut their children's risk of developing asthma by as much as one-third, a new clinical trial suggests.

The fish oil dose was high -- with fatty acid levels that were 15 to 20 times more than the average American gets from food.

But there were no significant sid...

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children of mothers who smoke during pregnancy may be at increased risk for kidney damage, a new study warns.

Researchers looked at test results for excessive protein in the urine (proteinuria) -- which is a sign of reduced kidney function -- in nearly 44,600 children in Japan who were followed until age 3.

Among the mothers in the...

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although families with a child with Down syndrome do face extra medical expenses, they probably won't be deeply burdened financially, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that average monthly out-of-pocket medical costs are about $80 more for children with Down syndrome compared to other kids. That adds up to about $18,000 over the first 18...

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities...

THURSDAY, Nov. 24, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Are you planning to shop on Black Friday for holiday gifts for the kids? Experts urge you to keep an eye on eye safety when making your choices.

U.S. emergency rooms treated 251,800 toy-related injuries in 2014, according to a report last year from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Forty-four percent of those injuries were to the ...

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After a child's cancer diagnosis, parents' income often drops and mothers frequently stop working, a new study finds.

Moreover, the financial effects of a cancer diagnosis can last years, with mothers' earnings dipping significantly more than fathers' pay, the study suggests.

Mothers' incomes fell 21 percent in the first year afte...

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise among American children, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed blood samples collected from kids aged 1 to 17 who received outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit and long-term care between 1999 and 2012.

During that time, the rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria sampl...

THURSDAY, Nov. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Does playing video games on an iPad work better than standard eye-patching for improving vision in children with lazy eye?

Two new studies in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology reach seemingly contradictory answers. In one, patching worked better. In the other, gaming outperformed standard treatment.

"If parents prefer their chi...

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized children who have suffered cardiac arrest have lower chances of surviving when CPR is performed on them at night than at other times of the day, a new study finds.

The finding is similar to what has been seen in studies of adult hospital patients, the researchers said.

The authors of the new study called the lower nightt...

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parents often fail to recognize post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) in young children, a new British study says.

"When people talk about PTSD they often think about soldiers returning from war zones. But children who experience traumatic events such as car accidents, assaults and natural disasters are also at risk of developing post-traumati...

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Despite three decades of advancements in treating children with cancer, patients who survive into adulthood don't report better physical or mental health than their counterparts who were treated years ago, researchers report.

Adults treated as children in the 1990s were more likely to report poor general health and anxiety than adults treated ...

MONDAY, Nov. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- All U.S. states have "return-to-play" laws designed to protect young athletes who've suffered a concussion. But only a handful have regulations on handling kids' return to the classroom, researchers report.

As of May 2016, only eight states had "return-to-learn" laws aimed at managing kids' concussion recovery, the researchers found.

...

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The American love of football can extend to children as young as 6, and these pint-sized players aren't immune to injury, a leading pediatricians' group says.

Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries suffered by youth football players, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Sprains are usually treated with rest, ice, co...

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A deadly complication of measles infection may be more common than thought, researchers report.

While a case of the measles typically runs its course in two weeks, the virus can sometimes spread to the brain. Once there, it can lay dormant for years before reappearing as a progressive, debilitating brain disorder known as subacute sclerosing p...

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A skin patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein may help treat children and young adults with peanut allergy, researchers report.

The new approach "looks promising and has potential," said study author Dr. Marshall Plaut. He is chief of the food allergy, atopic dermatitis and allergic mechanisms section at the U.S. National Institut...

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new study raises questions about the effectiveness of medicines commonly prescribed to prevent migraines in children and teens.

The 24-week clinical trial involving 328 patients found no significant differences between the drugs amitriptyline (Elavil), topiramate (Topamax) and a placebo sugar pill in reducing the number of days with a migr...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A therapy that focuses on parents' communication skills may have lasting benefits for young children with autism, a new clinical trial suggests.

Researchers from the United Kingdom found that preschool children who took part in the program had less-severe autism symptoms six years later, compared to kids who received standard autism service...

FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of American children with headaches are being seen at pediatric emergency departments and admitted to the hospital, researchers report.

The researchers at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh looked at headache-related visits made to their ER between 2007 and 2014. The children were all between 4 and 20 years old.

H...

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children in foster care face increased risks of physical and mental health issues, from asthma to ADHD to depression, a new study finds.

Considering the adversity foster children face, the study results aren't surprising, the researchers added.

But this is the first study to compare their rates of health issues to those of U.S. child...

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used an often-prescribed type of antidepressant during pregnancy may be more likely to develop speech and language disorders, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that mothers who bought selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs at least twice during pregnancy were 37 percent more likely to have a child w...

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've found a potential genetic link to a child's higher risk of middle ear infections.

These painful infections are the most frequent reason kids are given antibiotics, according to the researchers. They said the new discovery could lead to more effective treatments.

The analysis of DNA samples from 13,000 children ...

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Wellness Library Results - 93

It wasn't that long ago that a California man in his mid-30s walked into a doctor's office with such astronomical levels of lead in his blood that he was barred from returning to work. Alarmed, health officials began looking into his workplace, the Alco Iron and Scrap Metal Co. in San Leandro, California. What they found at Alco was shocking: So much lead dust permeated the plant's atmosphere that...

What is Lyme disease? Lyme disease is an infection that your child can get if he's bitten by a tick carrying certain bacteria. Doctors call it the "great imitator" because it mimics other diseases, making it difficult to diagnose; in addition, a blood test can't confirm it until about three weeks following the bite. Left untreated, the infection can develop into a serious long-lasting illness th...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When children misbehave or act in defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous ways, parents want to show that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Parents may erroneously think spanking seems like a direct and effective way to do that, but it delivers other messages that we don't want to send:

What is swimmer's ear? It's an ear infection that kids and adults commonly get by swimming in a pool or lake. Water seeps into the ear canal and erodes its protective lining, making it easier for bacteria and fungi to take hold and multiply. Any infection of the external ear -- that is, in or near the ear canal, as opposed to the middle ear -- is categorized as swimmer's ear. How could my child ...

How can I get my child to stop teasing? Talk to him. Start out by letting him know why you want to discuss his teasing, that is, because his friends or siblings are complaining about it, and you don't like it, either. Explain that there's a difference between a funny comment and taunting that leads to tears. Let him know that his gibes have a consequence: His friends and family may not want to pla...

A few hundred years ago, doctors believed baby teeth could be deadly. In one year alone in 19th-century England, more than 5,000 babies supposedly died of teething. Today, we know that teething isn't really dangerous. New teeth can make your baby cranky and uncomfortable, but the misery will soon pass. Here's what you need to know to help both of you get through this trying time. How can I tell ...

What causes allergies? Every human body carries an arsenal of chemicals to fight off bacteria, viruses, and other intruders, but sometimes these weapons backfire. If your child has allergies, she responds to things in the environment that are not invaders. The body produces antibodies, and when your child is exposed to the irritant a second time, her body releases a number of chemicals. One of th...

There are things we just don't talk about in polite company. There are subjects one doesn't broach at the dinner table. Take bodily vermin, for example. A few months ago, I couldn't have pictured myself sipping a post-prandial cup of coffee and Sambuca at a friend's house, chitchatting about the efficacy of various techniques for ridding one's household of lice and their dastardly offspring, nits,...

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

What should I do if my child breaks a bone or dislocates a joint? A broken bone or dislocated joint is a serious injury that requires a doctor's immediate attention. The best thing you can do is protect the injured area, making sure your child doesn't worsen the damage. Fractures are breaks, cracks, or chips in a bone. A fractured bone that pierces through the skin is called an open fracture. ...

If you're preparing for an international adoption, you're probably knee-deep in paperwork, waiting to be matched, or scheduling a flight for China, Russia, India, or another country to meet your new son or daughter for the first time. With all the excitement, medical tests for your child after you return home may be the last thing on your mind. But once you get home, it should be high on your li...

What are mumps? Caused by a virus that infects the salivary glands near the jawbone, mumps is a highly contagious illness that shows up mainly in swelling and soreness in the jaw area. The swelling is usually on both sides, so that the sufferer bears a passing resemblance to a chipmunk. In some cases, though, one side may puff up several days before the other. Your child may run a fever and compl...

Consider the standards used to diagnose oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and you may think they could describe any kid on a bad day -- and almost any teenager almost every day: They argue with adults, deliberately annoy people, defy rules, and have high fits of temper. All these activities are all-too-familiar to parents. The distinction lies in the frequency and intensity of the behavior. F...

What is croup? Croup is a common childhood infection marked by labored breathing and hoarse coughing. It's most likely to show up in toddlers, but it can occur at any age. Croup usually begins as a respiratory infection, and a child may have a runny nose for several days before beginning to cough. If your child has croup, her airways will probably become sore and swollen, making it hard for her ...

At one time or another, almost every child will refuse to take a pill or swig of medicinal syrup. Here are some tips to help the medicine go down:

  • Be honest. Do not tell your child that the medicine is candy (he might suddenly crave a handful). Instead, explain that the medicine is very important and that you will find some way to help him to take it.
  • If liquids are the only opt...

What is diaper rash? By the time your child reaches the toddler years, you've probably already seen your share of diaper rashes: red, inflamed skin hiding under the diaper or training pants. The rash -- usually found in the genital area, the inner thighs, or the buttocks -- can be either dry or moist. Sometimes the rash looks pimply, making the expression "smooth as a baby's bottom" seem like a ...

How can I tell if my child's too sick for daycare? It's not always easy. Obviously you don't want your kid to pass a phlegmy cough along to all his pals, but it's a much harder call when he has nothing more than a runny nose. In general, you shouldn't bring your child to daycare if the illness is contagious and could do anything more than make any youngster a little cranky. Here are some spe...

What is a middle ear infection? A middle ear infection is simply an invasion of viruses or bacteria into the small space that lies just beyond the eardrum. The germs usually stage the assault while a child is recovering from a cold or flu, ailments that leave her ears partly clogged with fluids and create an ideal habitat for microbes. As the infection takes hold, the middle ear fills with pus, a...

Can children get type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes used to be practically unheard of in people under 30. That explains the other common name for the disease: adult-onset diabetes. Not long ago, almost all children with diabetes suffered from the type 1 form of the disease, which means their bodies couldn't produce enough insulin. And type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas may produce normal insulin...

Once upon a time not so long ago, in a land very close to home, children faced bleak prospects when it came to learning about and coping with type 1 diabetes. Stern lectures from clinicians and educators, do's and don'ts imposed by parents, secrecy borne of fear that peers would shun them. By comparison, eating spinach or visiting the dentist was a breeze. Today, however, high-tech tools make kids...

What is bulimia nervosa? Although this eating disorder is less well-known than anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa is actually more common among American teenage and young women -- and just as serious. Bulimia nervosa, or simply "bulimia," is often referred to as "bingeing and purging." In other words, people with this eating disorder go on wild eating binges, consuming between 1,000 and 20,000 cal...

Choking is a serious threat to people of all ages. Whenever something gets stuck in the throat -- a piece of food, a child's toy, or blood from an injury -- it can block a person's air supply. After four to six minutes without air, the brain begins to die. If someone is choking, quick action can save a life. How can you tell if someone is choking? A choking victim will often put both hands on his...

In 1994, Kurt Cobain took his life at the age of 27. Like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, and other rock stars who died young before him, Cobain has achieved a youthful immortality in which his memory endures as symbol more than man. As the reluctant poster child for Seattle's early-'90s grunge rock explosion, Cobain never adjusted to his enormous fame as leader of the band Nirvana. His ...

It was just another Monday morning, the beginning of a normal school week, when 15-year-old Charles Andrew Williams whipped out a .22-caliber revolver in the bathroom of his high school in Santee, California, and unleashed a barrage of fire at the students around him. By the time police responded, two of the troubled teen's classmates were killed and 13 wounded in the ensuing melee. Tragically, th...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? Everybody has trouble speaking from time to time. We've all filled sentences with "um" or "uh" or stumbled through a nerve-wracking speech. But when a child has a stuttering problem, words can be a daily struggle. Stuttering usually starts between the ages of 2 and 5, but it can arise anytime before the teenage years. Watch for these signs: ...

Shortly after meeting their new baby, many parents will take a quick look for birthmarks. They may find a mole, a red splotch, or a patch of skin that's a different color from the rest of the body. Birthmarks come in several different varieties, most of them harmless and easy to ignore. Some marks fade away over the years, and others, if desired, can often be removed or concealed. There are two...

They poke, they complain, they have a strange need to use the restroom every 20 minutes, and they have almost no sense of time and distance -- in short, young kids are not always ideal companions on a long car trip. Then again, what fun is a family vacation if you don't take the family? In minivans and station wagons across the country, parents doing what they can to keep everyone safe and sane on...

Mongolian spots -- more properly called slate grey nevi -- are very common birthmarks. They are flat and bluish-gray, almost bruise-like. You might be concerned if such a mark show up on your baby, but there's really no reason to worry. Mongolian spots don't hurt, and they won't get any worse as a child gets older. In fact, they often fade over time. By the time your child is in grade school, ther...

Whooping cough (pertussis) is a disease that should be rare by now. We've had an effective vaccine against whooping cough for decades, but the illness continues to thrive. In 2009, 17,000 cases were reported in the United States among people of all ages, and many more cases go unreported. In fact, an unusual whooping cough outbreak in California in 2010 sickened more than 6,000 infants and kille...

The typical arthritis sufferer has at least a few gray hairs, a wrinkle here and there, and joints that have started to wear out after decades of use. But not every person with arthritis fits that profile. Some forms of arthritis can strike children or even infants. Arthritis may seem like a cruel fate for a young person, but many children cope admirably with their disease. With treatment and supp...

What should I do if my child gets something stuck in her ear or nose? Stay calm, and reassure her that it's no big deal. If the object is clearly visible and soft or flexible enough to be removed easily, grasp it with a pair of tweezers and gently pull it out. Never attempt to remove an object with a cotton swab or household items such as matches or toothpicks; you could end up pushing it farther...

What's the best way to treat a sunburn? For starters, make sure your child drinks plenty of water; he's probably dehydrated from being out in the sun. To soothe the sunburned area, apply a cold washcloth or let your child soak in a cool bath. (Adding baking soda or Aveeno colloidal oatmeal to the water can make it more soothing.) Acetaminophen or ibuprofen can also ease the pain. Avoid using pe...

How can I tell if my child has poison oak, ivy, or sumac? Many substances can cause an allergic reaction called contact dermatitis. But if your child has been playing in areas where poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac grows, you can consider the plant a likely culprit. An allergic reaction, marked by redness, itchiness, and swelling, usually shows up 12 to 48 hours after contact, but can take...

How do I stop a nosebleed? First, have your child sit or stand up to reduce the blood pressure in the veins of the nose so that bleeding slows. Have him lean forward and spit out any blood. For a young child, gently pinch the nose shut near the tip with a tissue or clean washcloth, using your thumb and index finger to hold it closed. (Older children can do this themselves.) Remind your child to b...

CPR -- cardiopulmonary resuscitation -- is a potentially life-saving procedure that can restart a person's heartbeat and breathing. CPR is often used to revive victims of electric shock, near-drowning, and heart attack. According to the National Institutes of Health, quick CPR can triple a victim's chances for survival. The best way to learn the technique is to take a certified training class. (Se...

What are canker sores? They're small, painful, crater-like nuisances that sprout on the tongue or on the inside of the cheeks. The sores are usually white, gray, or yellowish with a red rim and last up to two weeks. (Some people confuse them with cold sores, which form blisters instead of craters and usually show up on or around the lips.) Canker sores are most common in teenagers and women, but ...

You know you need to brush your teeth and floss every day. But do you know how to get the most out of it? Even if you think you mastered brushing and flossing in grade school, you may still have a few things to learn. What kind of toothbrush should I buy? America is a world leader in toothbrush technology. Walk through the oral hygiene aisle of a grocery store, and you'll discover many innovatio...

Why does my child have a sore throat? In children, a sore throat is almost always due to an infection. A host of bacteria and viruses can cause this common condition, also known as pharyngitis. Irritants such as cigarette smoke can also cause a sore throat. Is a sore throat ever serious? Most sore throats are harmless. Swollen glands, ear infection, and congestion can accompany sore throat, bu...

The first month of life is a steep learning curve for both the new baby and the new parents. In even a few short weeks, your baby will have come a long way from the moment he was born. Your baby starts life with more than 70 separate reflexes. Reflexes are instinctive, rather than learned, behaviors, and many will gradually fade away in the coming months. Two of the most important inborn skills ...

Should I spank my child? The short answer is no. When your child misbehaves or acts in ways that are defiant, inappropriate, or even dangerous, you want to show him that this behavior is unacceptable and needs to change. Spanking may seem like a direct and effective way to do that, but it also delivers other messages you don't want to be sent:

Lynn White, an assistant professor of research at Northeast Ohio University's College of Medicine, recently got a surprise when she tried to pick up her son's middle-school backpack. The pack didn't look unusually full, but it weighed somewhere in between a bowling-ball bag and a sack of bricks. "I thought 'Oh my gosh, I can't even put this on the table,'" she says. Modern backpacks are designed ...

What is strep throat? Strep throat is a bacterial throat infection marked by swelling and extreme soreness of the back of the throat, or pharynx. It can hurt so much your child doesn't want to swallow. (The name "strep throat" is a shorthand term for the throat infection, which is caused by Group A streptococcus bacteria.) Other symptoms of strep are fever (often above 101 degrees), chills, decre...

How can I tell if my child has a stuttering problem? The mind of a toddler is buzzing with questions, commands, and mangled lyrics to "Sesame Street" songs. Your child is probably still learning how to turn his thoughts into intelligible sounds, and mistakes are bound to happen. He may pepper his speech with "um" and "uh" or frequently repeat words or phrases ("Hey, hey, hey, hey, Mom. Can I, uh,...

When should my child start brushing? Clean your child's very first teeth by rubbing them gently with a damp piece of gauze. But when the first molars come in, usually by the age of ten months, it's time to start daily brushing. Use a soft-bristled brush and water. Move the brush back and forth gently in short strokes, making sure you reach the front, back, and chewing surfaces of all teeth. Be ex...

What is Roseola? Roseola, or roseola infantum, is a fairly mild childhood disease that causes fever and a rash. Sometimes called "baby measles," it typically strikes children between the ages of 6 months and 2 years. It's caused by the human herpes virus 6, a cousin of the viruses that cause cold sores and genital herpes. What are the symptoms? Roseola generally starts with a moderate to hig...

Anxiety is a normal part of children's behavioral and emotional development, and as children get older, their concerns grow broader. Your child may be worried about a spelling test, a soccer match, or riding the school bus for the first time. These anxieties are common, even signs that your child's development is on track. Why is my child so anxious? As children get older, they subject themselve...

By now your child has reached elementary school age and you feel pretty well in tune with his personality -- his shyness is just part of the package. Still, you wonder how you can make life easier for him. The key is to avoid the two opposing -- and perhaps equally strong -- temptations to pressure and overprotect him. Trying to get him to be more outgoing will only make him retreat. And shelterin...

What is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder? ADHD (commonly known as ADD) is a behavioral disorder. Basically, children who have it are unable to concentrate, excessively active, or both. The American Psychiatric Association calls the distinct types "inattentive" and "hyperactive-impulsivity." Some kids with attention deficit disorder repeatedly fail to finish tasks, get distracted easily, a...

What is sickle cell anemia? Sickle cell anemia is a disease of red blood cells that is passed from parent to child. Normally red blood cells contain a protein called hemoglobin A, which carries oxygen to all the organs in the body. With sickle cell anemia, however, the body makes a different kind of protein, called hemoglobin S. The problem is that when a red blood cell with hemoglobin S relea...

What are the sinuses? The sinuses are four sets of air-filled cavities located behind and around the nose and eyes. Many people (adults as well as children) only become aware of these spaces when they begin hurting, so they may not appreciate their value. Sinuses make a person's skull lighter (so that we can hold our head up) and filter out many irritating airborne particles in the air that's br...

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