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Results for search "Hospitals".

29 Jun

LGB Discrimination and Health Risks

Discrimination may increase risk of physical and mental health issues among LGB adults, study finds.

28 Jun

The Cost of a Hospital Stay

A hospital stay could cost you more than $1,000 even with good health insurance, study finds.

Health News Results - 721

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Far more patients than expected are willing to reveal their sexual orientation when they visit the emergency room, a new study finds.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Academy of Medicine recommend routine collection of sexual orientation information in health care settings. In 2015, the U.S. Centers for Medicare a...

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria sickens thousands of Americans and leads to millions of dollars in health care costs each year, a new study finds.

Transmission of the mosquito-borne disease in the United States was stamped out decades ago. But it still affects Americans who travel to regions where it remains common, such as Africa, Asia and Latin America, and then b...

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of U.S. emergency rooms are giving patients medication through the nose instead of via injections or IVs, new research shows.

The new approach "is easy, fast and noninvasive," wrote emergency department pharmacist Megan Rech and colleagues from Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill.

Doctors or nurses simp...

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid addicts who get their medical care in settings such as primary care offices and hospitals, rather than addiction centers, are 10 times more likely to die than patients without substance abuse disorders, a new study finds.

Opioids include powerful prescription painkillers such as oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin), a...

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- They may look like tons of fun, but all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are actually tons of trouble for kids.

And efforts to reduce ATV-related injuries among children in the United States haven't had much impact, a new study said.

"The injuries children sustain from ATV-related accidents are frequently more severe than injuries receive...

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans with Crohn's disease are ending up in the hospital than in the past, according to a new federal study.

Crohn's is a chronic inflammatory bowel disorder that often leads to surgery for most with the disease.

Hospitalization rates for Crohn's disease remained stable in the United States between 2003 and 2013. That's ...

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When a bedside alarm goes off in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto.

That rarely happens, however, and a new study helps explain why.

Researchers found that nurses are usually quick to react when alarms are urgent. But, they're slower to respond at the end of the workday or when they suffer fro...

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes are typically associated with the elderly, but new research suggests that strokes are increasingly happening to Americans under 65.

The study looked at a sample of data from some U.S. stroke hospitalizations. From 2003 to 2004 in this sample, more than 141,000 people from 18 to 65 were admitted to hospitals for stroke. By 2011 to 201...

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Severe drought can put older people at added risk of heart and lung illness -- and even death, a new study finds.

Scientists forecast more droughts in the United States as climate change patterns continue.

In the new study, researchers analyzed health and drought data from 618 counties in the western United States. The data includ...

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients may be less likely to die if they are treated during weeks that inspectors are checking on the staff, a new study suggests.

In the United States, hospitals are accredited by a body known as the Joint Commission. Inspectors from the commission make unannounced visits to each hospital every 18 to 36 months, to make sure staf...

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital care for gunshot wounds cost the United States about $6.6 billion over a nine-year period, and total costs are likely much higher, researchers report.

"There is a high cost for these injuries, especially because they are preventable," study author Sarabeth Spitzer, a medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine, said in...

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents don't count on getting a same-day appointment with their child's doctor and turn to other health care options when their kids are suddenly sick, a new survey finds.

More than 2,000 parents of youngsters up to age 18 were surveyed in the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The parents were as...

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of older Americans live out their final hours alone in a hospital bed.

But at some hospitals, a comforting presence at a patient's bedside is considered essential end-of-life medicine. So, if there are no friends or loved ones to keep vigil, a volunteer might fill the void.

"It's amazing how much just having someone hold a...

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just because your doctor orders more -- or more high-priced -- tests and procedures when you're in the hospital doesn't mean that you get better care, a new study suggests.

Medicare patients treated by higher-spending physicians are just as likely to be re-admitted or die within 30 days of being admitted to the hospital as patients treated by...

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that winter is a particularly precarious time for heart failure patients.

Both reports found that these vulnerable patients are more likely to be hospitalized and to die during cold weather months. And one of the studies also found the cost and length of hospitalization for heart failure rose during winter.

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research suggests.

"Efforts to improve disinfection in the hospital environment usually focus on surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of health care workers or patients," explained lead researcher Dr. Abhishek Deshpande, from the Cle...

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some U.S. hospitals might be charging private insurers twice as much for knee and hip replacements as the implants typically cost, new research suggests.

It's not clear why the discrepancy exists, and an official with a national trade association of hospitals cautioned against drawing too many conclusions from a finding that only involved one...

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that the battle against "superbugs" -- multidrug-resistant bacteria -- should begin in hospital sinks.

In the study, scientists found that germs colonize in drainpipes and gradually make their way into sinks. The researchers warned that this is one way hospital patients could be exposed to superbugs.

Previous ...

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of stroke in the following weeks and months, new research suggests.

People who sought care at a hospital for serious mental health conditions -- such as depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder -- faced a tripled risk of stroke following their v...

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The intensive care unit (ICU) may not improve the chances of survival for all patients with serious heart problems, a new study suggests.

"We found that the ICU may not always be the answer. Now, we need to help doctors decide who needs the ICU and who doesn't," study lead author Dr. Thomas Valley said.

He's a pulmonary and critical ...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- While implanted defibrillators can deliver a potentially lifesaving shock to a heart that's beating erratically, patients often wind up in the emergency room or the hospital needing medical procedures afterwards, a new study shows.

That was the case whether the shock was needed or not, and in 38 percent of cases it wasn't, the researchers ...

FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Flu activity spiked sharply across the United States this week, federal health officials reported Friday.

Deaths from flu-related conditions continued at high levels, and hospitalizations among people over 65 and under the age of 4 are up. So far, 20 children have died from flu, said Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist for the U.S. Centers for...

THURSDAY, Feb. 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals are noisy -- maybe too noisy for the tiniest patients, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are exposed to potentially harmful noise levels -- sometimes twice the maximum levels recommended by a leading group of U.S. pediatricians.

"Often the noise we meas...

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- More than three-quarters of workers at six Houston hospitals are overweight or obese, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed 924 employees -- mostly technicians and administrators -- about their health status and diet. Doctors weren't part of the survey.

The results showed that 78 percent were overweight or obese. Fruit and vegeta...

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies offer insights into the medical plights facing undocumented immigrants in the United States.

One finds that some hospice programs often refuse to accept these immigrants in the final days of their lives. The other reveals the hardships faced by those suffering from kidney failure who can't get regular dialysis, the study authors...

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. patients with a common heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation (AFib) are ending up in the hospital more often than before, a new study says.

The good news is that they're surviving more, too.

"The more intensive and costly inpatient care that we're providing for AFib recently is associated with decreasing rates of readm...

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Death rates are lower for older Americans treated by doctors trained in other countries than by those who went to a U.S. medical school, a new study reports.

That finding held true even though foreign-trained doctors are more likely to care for patients with more chronic health problems.

The results of this study should dispel America...

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Each year, about 10,000 generally healthy U.S. Medicare patients die within seven days of discharge from a hospital emergency department, a new study contends.

"We know that hospitals vary a lot in how often they admit patients to the hospital from the ED [emergency department], but we don't know whether this matters for patient outcomes," sa...

FRIDAY, Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although this year's flu season appears to be an average one so far, more hospitalizations are being reported and deaths are increasing, federal health officials reported Friday.

And it will be several weeks before the season peaks, said Lynnette Brammer, an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A newly approved drug may help in the battle against Clostridium difficile -- a potentially fatal "superbug" gut infection that has become a scourge in U.S. hospitals.

In two clinical trials, researchers found that the drug, called bezlotoxumab (Zinplava), cut the risk of a recurrent C. difficile infection by almost 40 percent...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overuse of antibiotics triggered a severe diarrhea outbreak in British hospitals that began in 2006, a new study reports.

Researchers analyzed hospital data related to the outbreak of Clostridium difficile, a "superbug" gut infection. The investigators concluded that reducing the use of fluoroquinolones -- antibiotics such as ciprof...

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in treating infants and children whose hearts suddenly stop beating, a new study suggests.

The study included 329 children, aged 2 days to 18 years, who suffered cardiac arrest in a hospital. Some had their body temperature maintained within normal range, while others had their ...

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Improved catheter safety measures in hospitals significantly reduce bloodstream infections and health care costs, a new study indicates.

"Safety interventions are a win-win for both patients and hospitals," said study leader Dr. Teryl Nuckols of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She is director of the center's division of general int...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalization-related delirium may speed mental decline in patients with dementia, a new study suggests.

Delirium affects about one-fourth of older hospital patients and causes confusion and disorientation.

British researchers looked at brain samples from nearly 1,000 people from the United Kingdom and Finland. They were 65 and ...

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rude parents can rattle medical staff enough to compromise the quality of care their critically ill child receives, a new study suggests.

Medical teams in a neonatal intensive care unit made worse decisions during simulated emergency scenarios if they had been treated rudely by an actress playing the role of an angry family member, the resear...

FRIDAY, Jan. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors treated in a emergency room for illness or injury are more likely to become disabled and less physically agile over the next six months, researchers report.

"We know that if older persons go to the hospital and are admitted, they are at increased risk of disability and functional decline. This study shows that patients discharged from t...

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients admitted to intensive care units probably don't need treatment in that expensive setting, new research suggests.

"Our study found over 50 percent of patients admitted to the ICU were categorized into groups suggesting that they were potentially either too well or too sick to benefit from ICU care or could have received equivale...

TUESDAY, Dec. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients have a higher risk of cardiac arrest and transfers to intensive care if they're in wards when other patients have recently suffered similar emergencies, a new study suggests.

"This should serve as a wake-up call for hospital-based physicians," study author Dr. Matthew Churpek, an assistant professor of medicine at the ...

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- It's not the chill of winter that causes a spike in heart-related deaths at Christmas and New Year's -- it's the holiday season itself, Australian researchers contend.

In New Zealand, where December and January are the height of summer, researchers found more than a 4 percent increase in heart-related deaths from Dec. 25 through Jan. 7.

...

TUESDAY, Dec. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding Medicaid -- the U.S. federal-state health insurance program for the poor -- gives people access to a broader array of hospital choices than they had when they were uninsured, a new study suggests.

Often, people are choosing hospitals closer to home, researchers reported.

The study uses data from two investor-owned hospital...

MONDAY, Dec. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older Americans who land in the hospital are more likely to survive if their doctor is a woman, a new study suggests.

In a national study, researchers found that older hospital patients treated by female internists had a slightly lower death rate than those treated by men.

Their risk of being readmitted to the hospital within 30 days...

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama on Tuesday signed into law sweeping bipartisan health care legislation intended to expand medical research and speed up approval of new drugs and medical devices.

The $6.3 billion bill, called the 21st Century Cures Act, is a complex grab bag of initiatives amounting to nearly 1,000 pages.

With the new legisla...

TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children in poorer countries are much more likely to die after emergency abdominal surgery than those in wealthy nations, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed the outcomes of more than 1,400 children in 43 countries who had emergency abdominal surgery in 2014. The surgeries were for conditions such as appendicitis, congenital abnormalities...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Congress has passed sweeping bipartisan health care legislation intended to expand medical research and speed up approval of new drugs and medical devices.

The $6.3 billion bill, called the 21st Century Cures Act, is a complex grab bag of initiatives amounting to nearly 1,000 pages that President Barack Obama is expected to sign int...

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest patients who receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within five minutes of their heart stopping are more likely to survive than those who don't receive the drug within that time frame, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed outcomes among more than 100,000 patients who suffered cardiac arrest while staying at nearly 550 hospit...

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients who are handed off by their original medical team to a new set of caregivers may ultimately face a higher risk of early death, new research warns.

The finding does not apply to daily shift changes or new patients who see one doctor or nurse at admitting, and then another shortly thereafter.

Rather, it centers on...

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors are at increased risk for the most severe type of heart attack and require close attention to their heart health, a new study suggests.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., reviewed data on more than 2,300 patients who suffered this type of heart attack, called ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). One in...

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Preprogrammed doses of medications that can raise the risk of falls are often set too high for older hospital patients, new research shows.

In the study, doctors looked at the records of 287 patients over the age of 65 who fell while staying in a large urban hospital. Some patients fell more than once, adding to a total of 328 falls in the st...

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The war against infectious diseases -- medicine versus microbes -- has been holding steady, with the U.S. death rate from these diseases about the same now as it was in 1980, new research says.

But some of the specific disease threats have changed over the years, the study authors noted.

Researchers found that the national death rat...

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having retail health clinics near hospitals does not reduce emergency department visits for minor health problems, a new study finds.

It was hoped that lower costs and increased convenience of clinics in drug stores or retail chains would curb emergency department visits, but these findings add to growing evidence that this is not the case, ac...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

Hospitals are supposed to be places of recovery and healing. But they can also be dangerous. A 1999 landmark study sponsored by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) estimated that medical errors in hospitals kill between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans each year. Approximately 7,000 of these deaths are due to errors in medications. The message is clear: Whether you're being treated for a heart attack or a ...

On a visit to her oncologist, breast cancer patient Vicki Tosher didn't think to ask a key question about bone marrow transplantation: Might she interview other women who had undergone this procedure as a way to better gauge whether it was the right option for her? Thanks to the guardian angel at her side -- Tosher's significant other, who did pose that question as her unofficial patient advocate...

Latex is one more example of a natural product with certain useful properties that are superior to anything manmade. This liquid, found in tropical rubber trees, is perfect for making products that need to be constructed out of a material that's strong, stretchy, thin and lightweight. That's why you can find it in products as diverse as pacifiers, balloons, disposable gloves, and condoms. Just a...

Like many people, Anthony Passaro Jr., a 60-year-old retired postal worker from Wantagh, New York, harbors a strong fear of hospitals. His fear just happens to run deeper than most. Stays in the hospital nearly killed both of his parents. In 1993, his mother, Eleanor, barely survived a botched laser surgery for gallstones. The surgeon accidentally nicked her bile duct with the laser, setting off c...

Whether you're looking for the aspirin in your medicine cabinet or recuperating in a hospital bed, safety should be uppermost in your mind. How much do you know about protecting yourself? Take this short quiz to find out. 1. According to a report from the Institute of Medicine, mistakes in hospitals kill about half as many Americans each year as car accidents. True or false? True False 2....

You go to the hospital when you are sick or injured and need care. The last thing you expect is that the hospital will make you sicker. But for up to 10 percent of hospital patients, that's exactly what happens. It turns out that hospitals are a breeding ground for infections -- many of which are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estim...

The first time Darcy Orr saw her newborn twins, they were sleeping in separate plastic incubators filled with monitors and wires. Born 10 weeks too early, Cassie and Caden each weighed less than three pounds and were unable to breathe on their own. Like other newborns in distress, the babies went straight from the delivery room to the neonatal intensive care unit or NICU (pronounced NICK-yoo). Or...

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