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Results for search "Hospitals".

29 Jun

LGB Discrimination and Health Risks

Discrimination may increase risk of physical and mental health issues among LGB adults, study finds.

28 Jun

The Cost of a Hospital Stay

A hospital stay could cost you more than $1,000 even with good health insurance, study finds.

Health News Results - 751

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid-related hospitalizations among women in the United States increased far faster than among men between 2005 and 2014, a federal government report says.

Among women, hospitalizations involving opioid painkillers or heroin rose 75 percent, compared to 55 percent among men, according to the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 (HealthDay News)-- It's a not uncommon occurrence: Patients discharge themselves from the hospital against their doctor's best advice.

Now, new research on over 29 million hospital stays sheds light on which types of patients are most prone to this behavior -- and why.

Using 2013 U.S. hospital data, researchers found that younger patients are much more...

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture is a safe and effective alternative to pain medications for some emergency room patients, a new study reports.

"While acupuncture is widely used by practitioners in community settings for treating pain, it is rarely used in hospital emergency departments," said study lead investigator Marc Cohen. He is a professor in the School of ...

FRIDAY, June 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Having a mood disorder significantly boosts the odds that young people with autism will be hospitalized for psychiatric care, according to a new study.

People with autism are often hospitalized when their behavior problems overwhelm their caregivers, the study authors said.

"The demand is far greater than the number of clinicians, t...

THURSDAY, June 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About 20 percent of U.S. hospital patients who receive antibiotics experience side effects from the drugs, researchers report.

The new study included nearly 1,500 hospitalized adults who were prescribed antibiotics. The findings revealed that one-fifth of those who experienced antibiotic-related side effects didn't require the drugs in the ...

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Staphylococcus aureus infections among U.S. hospital patients have been less resistant to key antibiotics in recent years, a new study finds.

Between 2009 and 2015, researchers tested antibiotic resistance in more than 19,000 S. aureus samples from 42 medical centers nationwide.

"Results showed that S. aureus' ...

FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and could slow their recovery, researchers report.

Their review of 20 studies on depression screening in hospitals showed that 33 percent of patients had symptoms of depression.

Patients with depression are less likely to take their medications and keep all recommended appointmen...

WEDNESDAY, June 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many teen boys treated at an ER following a violent assault also want psychological services to help them cope with the trauma, according to new research.

"Assault victims describe feeling constantly tense and 'on guard,' and having nightmares or unwanted flashbacks of the assault. Unfortunately, many youth also begin to avoid talking about ...

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Deadly Legionnaires' disease is lurking in the water systems of hospitals, nursing homes and long-term care facilities, putting the most vulnerable patients at risk, U.S. health officials said Tuesday.

About 10 percent of people who get Legionnaires' disease die from it, but in health care facilities the death rate is higher -- 25 percent of ...

FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are routinely overcharged for emergency room care, and minority and uninsured patients are most likely to face this "price gouging," a new report suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed 2013 billing records for more than 12,000 emergency medicine doctors nationwide.

On average, adult emergency department patients were...

THURSDAY, June 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There are times in life, like a health crisis, when a loved one needs you to be their eyes, ears and voice. Though you may be feeling anguish over his or her illness, a patient's pain, fear or even the effects of medication can keep them from being their own advocate.

But, you can play a role not only in supporting them through a stressful t...

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you wind up in the ER, chances are your doctors have no clue what the tests and treatments they order will cost, a new study finds.

Researchers asked more than 400 emergency medicine health care professionals -- including physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners -- about the cost of care for three types of cases commonly see...

THURSDAY, May 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals differ greatly in how often they move new stroke patients from treatment to comfort or hospice care, researchers report.

Comfort care refers to medical care designed to ease suffering for a patient near death.

"End-of-life and palliative care plays an important role with stroke, since the death rate is high, yet there...

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- One hospital's germ history may help doctors curb infections in all hospitals, researchers report.

Scientists analyzed more than 10,000 samples collected over 12 months from surfaces, air and water in the University of Chicago's new hospital, the Center for Care and Discovery. Samples were also taken from 252 patients. The samples were coll...

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- While the number of Americans hospitalized each year for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) appears to be holding steady, new research suggests the number of patients dying in the hospital over the past decade has decreased.

"This is certainly an encouraging trend," said study author Dr. Khushboo Goel, a second-year internal medici...

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new regulation requires New York state hospitals to follow a protocol to rapidly diagnosis and treat the potentially fatal infection known as sepsis, and research suggests it's saving lives.

The mandate was implemented after the death of 12-year-old Rory Staunton from undiagnosed sepsis in 2012. After the boy died, "Rory's Regulations" was...

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Major U.S. teaching hospitals are often considered more expensive than the competition, but a new study suggests they may have an important quality advantage.

Older adults treated at major teaching facilities are less likely to die in the weeks and months following their discharge than patients admitted to "non-teaching" or community hospital...

SUNDAY, May 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with the potentially life-threatening infection complication known as sepsis are less likely to receive immediate antibiotic treatment in overcrowded emergency departments, researchers say.

"Prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotics is the cornerstone of high-quality sepsis care, a fact emphasized in Medica...

FRIDAY, May 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People in U.S. emergency rooms may receive unnecessary opioid painkiller prescriptions for minor injuries such as a sprained ankle, a new study finds.

This practice -- which varies widely depending on what area of the country you're treated in -- potentially boosts the risk that patients will become dependent on the drugs.

"The substa...

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic people are less likely than white people to make an appointment to see a neurologist, according to a new U.S. study.

Researchers found that black people with conditions that affect the brain, such as Parkinson's disease and stroke, tend to be treated in the emergency room and end up in the hospital more often than their wh...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to popular wisdom, an older, more experienced doctor may not always be the best choice.

New research suggests that when treated by an older doctor, hospitalized patients 65 and older may face a slightly higher risk of dying within a month of their admittance than if treated by a younger physician.

One exception to that find...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting hospital patients with mild pancreatitis to start eating sooner may speed their recovery, a new study says.

The finding challenges the long-held belief that these patients should avoid solid food for days.

The University of Michigan researchers analyzed studies that included nearly 1,000 people hospitalized for pancreatitis. ...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An expectant mother's biggest risk for undergoing an unnecessary C-section can be the hospital she chooses for the delivery, a new analysis contends.

Hospital cesarean, or C-section, rates vary widely across the United States, from a low of 7 percent to a high of 64 percent, the Consumer Reports analysis found.

"That kind of v...

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although you often don't have a choice of when you get the heart procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), new research suggests that having it done over the weekend may be more risky.

The study reported that people hospitalized on the weekend for PCI were twice as likely to die as those hospitalized on weekdays.

PC...

THURSDAY, May 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hackers are increasingly targeting hospitals, using viruses to lock their computer systems and hold sensitive medical data and other files hostage, according to a doctor in Great Britain.

The computer viruses that lock the files are called ransomware. These attacks prevent hospitals from accessing the data stored on their computers until they...

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients who are readmitted to the same hospital after their initial treatment are more likely to survive and go home sooner, new Canadian research suggests.

Speedy treatment is critical for sudden events -- such as heart attack or stroke -- which explains why ambulance policies usually require patients to be taken to the clo...

WEDNESDAY, May 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cooling the body may reduce the risk of brain damage for cardiac arrest patients in a coma, a leading group of U.S. neurologists says.

The new guideline from the American Academy of Neurology recommends that families of these patients ask if their loved one qualifies for body cooling.

"People who are in a coma after being resuscita...

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands of kids wind up in U.S. emergency rooms every year for ear injuries caused by cotton swabs, a new study reveals.

The analysis of federal data found that about 263,000 children were treated in emergency departments for ear injuries caused by cotton swabs over the 21-year period from 1990 through 2010.

That works out to about 1...

MONDAY, May 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to treating pancreatic cancer, where you have your surgery may have some impact on how long you live, according to a new study.

The researchers found that people who travel to an academic medical center to undergo surgery for pancreatic cancer live a few months longer than those who choose to have their operation at a hospital clos...

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- About half of U.S. doctors received payments from the pharmaceutical and medical device industries in 2015, amounting to $2.4 billion, a new study reports.

Those payments and gifts very likely encourage doctors to prescribe pricey brand-name drugs and devices pushed by sales representatives, a second study argues.

Doctors at academic...

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Far more patients than expected are willing to reveal their sexual orientation when they visit the emergency room, a new study finds.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Academy of Medicine recommend routine collection of sexual orientation information in health care settings. In 2015, the U.S. Centers for Medicare a...

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria sickens thousands of Americans and leads to millions of dollars in health care costs each year, a new study finds.

Transmission of the mosquito-borne disease in the United States was stamped out decades ago. But it still affects Americans who travel to regions where it remains common, such as Africa, Asia and Latin America, and then b...

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of U.S. emergency rooms are giving patients medication through the nose instead of via injections or IVs, new research shows.

The new approach "is easy, fast and noninvasive," wrote emergency department pharmacist Megan Rech and colleagues from Loyola University Health System in Maywood, Ill.

Doctors or nurses simp...

FRIDAY, April 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid addicts who get their medical care in settings such as primary care offices and hospitals, rather than addiction centers, are 10 times more likely to die than patients without substance abuse disorders, a new study finds.

Opioids include powerful prescription painkillers such as oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin), a...

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- They may look like tons of fun, but all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) are actually tons of trouble for kids.

And efforts to reduce ATV-related injuries among children in the United States haven't had much impact, a new study said.

"The injuries children sustain from ATV-related accidents are frequently more severe than injuries receive...

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans with Crohn's disease are ending up in the hospital than in the past, according to a new federal study.

Crohn's is a chronic inflammatory bowel disorder that often leads to surgery for most with the disease.

Hospitalization rates for Crohn's disease remained stable in the United States between 2003 and 2013. That's ...

TUESDAY, April 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When a bedside alarm goes off in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto.

That rarely happens, however, and a new study helps explain why.

Researchers found that nurses are usually quick to react when alarms are urgent. But, they're slower to respond at the end of the workday or when they suffer fro...

MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes are typically associated with the elderly, but new research suggests that strokes are increasingly happening to Americans under 65.

The study looked at a sample of data from some U.S. stroke hospitalizations. From 2003 to 2004 in this sample, more than 141,000 people from 18 to 65 were admitted to hospitals for stroke. By 2011 to 201...

WEDNESDAY, April 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Severe drought can put older people at added risk of heart and lung illness -- and even death, a new study finds.

Scientists forecast more droughts in the United States as climate change patterns continue.

In the new study, researchers analyzed health and drought data from 618 counties in the western United States. The data includ...

THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients may be less likely to die if they are treated during weeks that inspectors are checking on the staff, a new study suggests.

In the United States, hospitals are accredited by a body known as the Joint Commission. Inspectors from the commission make unannounced visits to each hospital every 18 to 36 months, to make sure staf...

TUESDAY, March 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital care for gunshot wounds cost the United States about $6.6 billion over a nine-year period, and total costs are likely much higher, researchers report.

"There is a high cost for these injuries, especially because they are preventable," study author Sarabeth Spitzer, a medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine, said in...

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents don't count on getting a same-day appointment with their child's doctor and turn to other health care options when their kids are suddenly sick, a new survey finds.

More than 2,000 parents of youngsters up to age 18 were surveyed in the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. The parents were as...

TUESDAY, March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of older Americans live out their final hours alone in a hospital bed.

But at some hospitals, a comforting presence at a patient's bedside is considered essential end-of-life medicine. So, if there are no friends or loved ones to keep vigil, a volunteer might fill the void.

"It's amazing how much just having someone hold a...

MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Just because your doctor orders more -- or more high-priced -- tests and procedures when you're in the hospital doesn't mean that you get better care, a new study suggests.

Medicare patients treated by higher-spending physicians are just as likely to be re-admitted or die within 30 days of being admitted to the hospital as patients treated by...

WEDNESDAY, March 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies suggest that winter is a particularly precarious time for heart failure patients.

Both reports found that these vulnerable patients are more likely to be hospitalized and to die during cold weather months. And one of the studies also found the cost and length of hospitalization for heart failure rose during winter.

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital room floors may be more of a "superbug" threat than many hospital staffers realize, new research suggests.

"Efforts to improve disinfection in the hospital environment usually focus on surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of health care workers or patients," explained lead researcher Dr. Abhishek Deshpande, from the Cle...

TUESDAY, Feb. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Some U.S. hospitals might be charging private insurers twice as much for knee and hip replacements as the implants typically cost, new research suggests.

It's not clear why the discrepancy exists, and an official with a national trade association of hospitals cautioned against drawing too many conclusions from a finding that only involved one...

MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that the battle against "superbugs" -- multidrug-resistant bacteria -- should begin in hospital sinks.

In the study, scientists found that germs colonize in drainpipes and gradually make their way into sinks. The researchers warned that this is one way hospital patients could be exposed to superbugs.

Previous ...

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of stroke in the following weeks and months, new research suggests.

People who sought care at a hospital for serious mental health conditions -- such as depression, anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder -- faced a tripled risk of stroke following their v...

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The intensive care unit (ICU) may not improve the chances of survival for all patients with serious heart problems, a new study suggests.

"We found that the ICU may not always be the answer. Now, we need to help doctors decide who needs the ICU and who doesn't," study lead author Dr. Thomas Valley said.

He's a pulmonary and critical ...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

What can I do to comfort my child during medical procedures or hospital stays? Even though the typical pediatrician's office comes fully equipped with clowns on the wall and a dozen issues of Highlights magazine in the waiting room, your child will still look to you for comfort if he's worried or scared. Here are some tips for helping your child cope:

Hospitals are supposed to be places of recovery and healing. But they can also be dangerous. A 1999 landmark study sponsored by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) estimated that medical errors in hospitals kill between 44,000 and 98,000 Americans each year. Approximately 7,000 of these deaths are due to errors in medications. The message is clear: Whether you're being treated for a heart attack or a ...

On a visit to her oncologist, breast cancer patient Vicki Tosher didn't think to ask a key question about bone marrow transplantation: Might she interview other women who had undergone this procedure as a way to better gauge whether it was the right option for her? Thanks to the guardian angel at her side -- Tosher's significant other, who did pose that question as her unofficial patient advocate...

Latex is one more example of a natural product with certain useful properties that are superior to anything manmade. This liquid, found in tropical rubber trees, is perfect for making products that need to be constructed out of a material that's strong, stretchy, thin and lightweight. That's why you can find it in products as diverse as pacifiers, balloons, disposable gloves, and condoms. Just a...

Like many people, Anthony Passaro Jr., a 60-year-old retired postal worker from Wantagh, New York, harbors a strong fear of hospitals. His fear just happens to run deeper than most. Stays in the hospital nearly killed both of his parents. In 1993, his mother, Eleanor, barely survived a botched laser surgery for gallstones. The surgeon accidentally nicked her bile duct with the laser, setting off c...

Whether you're looking for the aspirin in your medicine cabinet or recuperating in a hospital bed, safety should be uppermost in your mind. How much do you know about protecting yourself? Take this short quiz to find out. 1. According to a report from the Institute of Medicine, mistakes in hospitals kill about half as many Americans each year as car accidents. True or false? True False 2....

You go to the hospital when you are sick or injured and need care. The last thing you expect is that the hospital will make you sicker. But for up to 10 percent of hospital patients, that's exactly what happens. It turns out that hospitals are a breeding ground for infections -- many of which are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estim...

The first time Darcy Orr saw her newborn twins, they were sleeping in separate plastic incubators filled with monitors and wires. Born 10 weeks too early, Cassie and Caden each weighed less than three pounds and were unable to breathe on their own. Like other newborns in distress, the babies went straight from the delivery room to the neonatal intensive care unit or NICU (pronounced NICK-yoo). Or...

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