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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

22 Dec

What is a silent heart attack?

Women more at risk of "silent" heart attack than men, new study finds.

11 Oct

Anger and Heart Attack Risk

Anger, emotional distress or heavy physical exertion can trigger heart attack symptoms, study finds.

25 Mar

Heart Attack Risk Factors on the Rise

Heart attack patients getting younger and more obese, new study finds.

Health News Results - 718

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can boost bone density and reduce anemia in older men with low levels of the hormone, but it might also open the door to future heart risks, a new set of trials suggests.

The findings come in the last four studies to be reported out of the Testosterone Trials, a set of seven overlapping federally funded year-long clinic...

FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The intensive care unit (ICU) may not improve the chances of survival for all patients with serious heart problems, a new study suggests.

"We found that the ICU may not always be the answer. Now, we need to help doctors decide who needs the ICU and who doesn't," study lead author Dr. Thomas Valley said.

He's a pulmonary and critical ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading killer of American women, but lifestyle changes can reduce the risk, a heart expert says.

An estimated 43 million women in the United States have heart disease, but many don't know it, according to Dr. Mary Ann McLaughlin. She's medical director of the Mount Sinai Health System's Cardiac Health Program in New York...

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is increasing at a troubling pace in the United States, with costs expected to double from $555 billion in 2016 to a whopping $1.1 trillion in 2035, a new American Heart Association report estimates.

"Our new projections indicate cardiovascular disease is on a course that could bankrupt our nation's economy and health care syste...

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gene variants that raise a person's odds of being "apple-shaped" may be linked to heightened risks of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a large study suggests.

Many previous studies have hinted that a large waistline can be particularly unhealthy, compared to carrying your weight around the hips and thighs ("pear-shaped"). This new research ...

TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease affects more than just the heart. It also can take a toll on the legs, feet, kidneys and even the brain, according to vascular surgery experts.

Heart disease is a general term, usually linked to arteriosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries," the Society for Vascular Surgery explained. Arteriosclerosis is a progressive disease ...

MONDAY, Feb. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Shoveling is the probable reason why men are more likely to suffer a heart attack after a heavy snowfall, researchers report.

In a new study, investigators analyzed data on heart attacks between the months of November and April in the province of Quebec between 1981 and 2014. About 60 percent of hospital admissions and deaths due to heart att...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults with any amount of calcified plaque in their arteries are already at risk of a heart attack, a new study finds.

Among those 32 to 46 years old, even a little calcified plaque -- called atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries -- can boost the odds for fatal or nonfatal heart disease fivefold over the next 12 years, resea...

TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A group of family physicians warns that too many Americans struggle with high blood pressure.

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart attack and heart failure, said Dr. John Meigs Jr., president of the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

Since February is National Heart Month, now is a good time for people to g...

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small study suggests that people who use e-cigarettes regularly may face an increased risk for heart disease.

Researchers said they found that 23 e-cigarette users were more likely to have two early indicators of heart risk than 19 people who did not "vape."

"This is the first study to look at these cardiac risk factors in habitu...

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Snowstorms may leave more than a big mess in their wake: New research shows a sharp spike in hospital admissions for heart trouble two days after these weather events.

Hospital admissions for heart attacks, chest pain and stroke actually fell on the day of the storm, the study found, possibly because people can't get out for care. But they reb...

MONDAY, Jan. 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a middle-aged couch potato, shoveling snow could put you at risk for a heart attack.

While shoveling isn't dangerous for many people, certain people are at higher risk. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people should check with a doctor first if they don't get regular exercise, have a medical condition or are midd...

THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure rates are going up in the United States, according to a new report from the American Heart Association.

The same report also said that heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States, even as the death rate from heart disease is heading down.

The number of American adults with heart failure -- in...

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Body cooling offers no advantage over normal temperature control in treating infants and children whose hearts suddenly stop beating, a new study suggests.

The study included 329 children, aged 2 days to 18 years, who suffered cardiac arrest in a hospital. Some had their body temperature maintained within normal range, while others had their ...

TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Younger survivors of thyroid cancer are at increased risk for certain types of health problems later in life, a new study suggests.

"As the number of thyroid cancer survivors grows, more people are living with other serious health conditions resulting from treatment," study lead author Brenna Blackburn said in an American Society of Clinical ...

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Poor women are more likely to suffer heart trouble than poor men are, a new review suggests.

Researchers analyzed 116 studies that included 22 million people in North America, Europe, Asia and Australasia. The findings showed that among poor people, women had a 25 percent higher risk of heart attack than men.

"It's widely known that ...

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You get your blood pressure checked at your doctor's office, and it reads in the normal range. You're fine, right?

Well, maybe not. A new study suggests that 17 million American adults may have what doctors call "masked" hypertension -- blood pressure that tends to be higher outside of the medical clinic environment.

"It can manife...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors have long known that a stressed life does no favors for the heart, and new research may help unravel why that's so.

A Harvard team says heightened activity in a key part of the brain may explain why stress boosts people's odds for heart disease and stroke.

The finding "raises the possibility tha...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Half of people tested at mobile clinics were unaware they had a condition that's often referred to as a "silent killer" -- high blood pressure, a new Canadian study reveals.

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, puts extra strain on the heart and blood vessels. This increases the risk for heart attack and stroke, the researchers s...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A molecule produced in the digestion of red meat, eggs and dairy products is linked to an increased risk of a fatal heart attack or stroke, researchers say.

Patients with high blood levels of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) were six times more likely within the next month to die, suffer a heart attack or stroke, or require surgery to reopen a...

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As the number of people around the world with elevated or high blood pressure increases, so do the number of deaths linked to this "silent killer," a new study contends.

An international analysis of nearly 9 million people states that the rate of high blood pressure (hypertension) and elevated blood pressure (prehypertension) jumped between ...

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Too few Americans who need them -- especially young adults -- are getting cholesterol-lowering statin medications, a new study suggests.

The study of nearly 3 million adults found that more than half of younger patients under 40 with too-high blood levels of LDL "bad" cholesterol are getting statins as recommended.

"This article cl...

MONDAY, Jan. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that people who abuse alcohol also boost their risk of three cardiac conditions: atrial fibrillation, heart attack and congestive heart failure.

The possible added risk appears to be about the same as that linked to high blood pressure, smoking, obesity and diabetes, the researchers said.

...

THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A stroke claimed the life of actress Debbie Reynolds, 84, on Wednesday -- just a day after her daughter Carrie Fisher died from a heart attack.

Reynold's son, Todd Fisher, told the Associated Press that the stress of losing her daughter may have been a contributing factor in his mother's death.

Now, doctors familiar with suc...

FRIDAY, Dec. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Holiday pressure can stress anybody out, but some women get so anxious about making everything perfect that they miss the signs of serious heart problems.

One of those threats is a so-called "silent heart attack."

"Most of the time people who are experiencing a heart attack will have pain in the chest, shortness of breath, etc. Sile...

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- It's not the chill of winter that causes a spike in heart-related deaths at Christmas and New Year's -- it's the holiday season itself, Australian researchers contend.

In New Zealand, where December and January are the height of summer, researchers found more than a 4 percent increase in heart-related deaths from Dec. 25 through Jan. 7.

...

THURSDAY, Dec. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most cardiologists in the United States are men, and many female cardiologists report discrimination in the workplace, a new survey finds.

"We need to increase the diversity of our workforce, and find ways to recruit higher numbers of women and underrepresented minorities," said survey senior author Dr. Claire Duvernoy, chair of the Women in...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who are less sensitive to pain may be at increased risk of having a "silent" heart attack, a new study hints.

Chest pain is one of the "classic" symptoms of a heart attack. But many people have so-called silent heart attacks, where they notice no obvious symptoms.

"Almost everyone knows what a heart attack is. When we hear ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As people with HIV are living longer, new concerns are cropping up, such as a risk for heart attack up to two times greater than for people without the AIDS-causing virus, a new study reports.

Those increased odds are seen even in people whose virus has been suppressed to undetectable levels in the blood with antiretroviral drugs, the resea...

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A small study finds that cancer patients who have diabetes may suffer worse heart damage from chemotherapy, potentially boosting their risk of heart failure.

There are increasing reports of toxic effects to the heart -- also known as cardiotoxicity -- due to chemotherapy with drugs known as anthracyclines, said study lead author Dr. Ana Catari...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smartphones might revolutionize cardiac research by giving instant, accurate insight into the physical activity of people using them, a new study finds.

"People check these devices [an average of] 46 times a day," noted study senior author Dr. Euan Ashley, an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University in Palo Alt...

MONDAY, Dec. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Beta blocker drugs are often the go-to medication for people who've survived a heart attack.

But a new study suggests that they may not be the medicine of choice for nursing home residents with dementia.

Taking the drugs reduced the risk of death during the study period by about a quarter, the researchers said. But the drugs were als...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who've suffered a heart attack or unstable angina may face a higher-than-normal risk of suicide, a new study suggests.

Researchers in Taiwan found that patients with the heart conditions were slightly more likely to die by suicide compared to people their age who had healthy hearts. The risk was particularly elevated in the first six ...

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tracking the change in an older adult's heart rate when they stand up might reveal their risk of death over the next several years, a new study suggests.

As the researchers explained, when people stand up their heart rate initially increases, and then recovers.

The speed of that heart rate recovery in the 20 seconds after standing...

TUESDAY, Dec. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest patients who receive epinephrine (adrenaline) within five minutes of their heart stopping are more likely to survive than those who don't receive the drug within that time frame, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed outcomes among more than 100,000 patients who suffered cardiac arrest while staying at nearly 550 hospit...

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a blood thinner is routine for many heart patients, but these drugs come with a risk of episodes of excess bleeding.

What, if any, anticoagulant (blood thinner) should these patients take after such episodes arise?

A new study suggests that the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) may be a better choice than the standby drug wa...

THURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survivors are at increased risk for the most severe type of heart attack and require close attention to their heart health, a new study suggests.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., reviewed data on more than 2,300 patients who suffered this type of heart attack, called ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). One in...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone treatment can increase a man's risk of potentially fatal blood clots, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that men taking the male hormone seem to have a 63 percent increased risk of a blood clot forming in a vein, a condition known as venous thromboembolism (VTE).

These clots can cause a heart attack, stroke, org...

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Healthier diets may be a factor in the ongoing decline in levels of unhealthy blood fats for Americans, new research suggests.

According to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, blood levels of total cholesterol, LDL ("bad") cholesterol, and the blood fats known as triglycerides have continued to fall among a...

TUESDAY, Nov. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- All smokers face a higher risk of heart attack, but the threat is particularly high among those under 50, a new study finds.

Compared to former smokers and nonsmokers in their age group, heart attack risk was nearly 8.5 times higher for smokers younger than 50, British researchers found.

One expert in smo...

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A major New Orleans hospital has seen a sharp spike in the rate of heart attacks in the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, a new study reports.

Heart attack admissions to Tulane Medical Center were three times higher during the 10 years after the hurricane struck in August 2005 than in the two years before that, according to...

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease tops the list of what's most likely to kill you or someone you love, U.S. health officials reported Thursday.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data naming the five leading causes of death among Americans under age 80 for 2014. After heart disease, cancer was the most likely cause of death. Roundi...

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Always seeing the cup as half empty, rather than half full, may increase the likelihood of dying from heart disease, Finnish researchers say.

An 11-year study of nearly 3,000 men and women found that those who were the most pessimistic were two times more likely to die of heart disease than those who were the least pessimistic. And, while ...

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans have a lifelong struggle with their waistlines -- dieting, losing weight, but then gaining it back again.

It's a pattern known as "yo-yo dieting," and a new study suggests it does no favors for older women's hearts.

"Women with a normal [weight] who experience yo-yo dieting throughout their adult life are at i...

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with rheumatoid arthritis may have an increased risk for a heart attack, stroke and other heart disease-related problems, a new study suggests.

Researchers examined data from 353 rheumatoid arthritis patients in the Netherlands who were followed for up to 15 years.

The rate of heart disease-related events in these patients wa...

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of an implanted heart device and intensive drug therapy may help boost heart function in end-stage heart failure patients, preliminary results of an ongoing study suggest.

The research focused on 36 patients who were implanted with what's known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), a kind of heart pump.

"Patients ...

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Marijuana use might raise the risk of a rare, temporary heart muscle malfunction that can feel like a full-fledged heart attack, a new study suggests.

People who used marijuana were almost twice as likely as non-users to suffer a bout of stress cardiomyopathy, a condition also known as takotsubo, said study co-auth...

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some people carry a genetically driven "salt tooth" that could affect how heavily they season their food, potentially endangering their heart, a new study suggests.

Genetic variations cause some people to be more keenly aware of bitter flavors, said lead researcher Jennifer Smith, a doctoral student at the Universit...

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many elderly smokers who've had a heart attack fail to fill prescriptions for medications designed to help them quit smoking, a new study finds.

"These findings come as no surprise for geriatricians and health care professionals who face on a daily basis the challenges of recognizing and managing the complexity of c...

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If your parent or sibling died young from cardiovascular disease, take heart: There are ways you can counter any genetic predisposition to the illness.

New research shows that people can minimize an inherited risk for heart attack by living right -- exercising, eating healthy, staying slim and quitting smoking.

Even with a little eff...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

A heart attack, like any other brush with death, can unleash intense waves of emotion. Many survivors feel scared and nervous, even though they're grateful to be alive. And unfortunately, many also slip into depression. Though feeling bleak may seem like a perfectly natural reaction to heart trouble, depression shouldn't be taken lightly. Left untreated, the condition can sap a heart patient's str...

The irony was as inescapable as the smoke. Here was Taku Ronsman choking on secondhand smoke at work every day in a city health department, where she gave advice on how to create a smoke-free workplace. Hard at work for the Brown County Tobacco-Free Coalition in Green Bay, Wisconsin, she developed chronic bronchitis from the cigarette smoke down the hall. The building -- which also housed the Ame...

We all owe our lives to the arteries that carry oxygen-rich blood from our lungs to our heart. If one of those arteries becomes blocked, part of the heart will begin to die. Doctors call this sudden blockage an "acute myocardial infarction," but it's also known as a heart attack. The pain of the attack itself may last for minutes or hours, but the roots of the problem often stretch back several d...

What is angina pectoris? Angina is temporary pain or discomfort in the chest that occurs when not enough oxygen-carrying blood reaches your heart muscle. (The term "angina" means "pain," while "pectoris" refers to the chest.) Sometimes angina feels like heartburn, the similar sensations you may get after eating a heavy meal. But if you feel this pain regularly, it may be a symptom of heart diseas...

"Driving that train/high on cocaine
Casey Jones, you better watch your speed ...
Come 'round the bend, you know it's the end
The fireman screams and the engine just gleams ..." -- The Grateful Dead Nearly four decades after the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia wrote the lyrics to "Casey Jones," the drug that inspired the song is enjoying a resurgence. More than 35 million Americans 12 y...

It happened so fast. Sharon Brooks, co-owner of the trendy but now-defunct Hamburger Mary's restaurant in San Francisco, was ringing out the cash register and trying to reach her son's girlfriend on the phone. But when the young woman answered, all that came out of Brooks' mouth was gibberish. "I tried to talk and couldn't. I went into the bathroom and felt my left side tingling," says Brooks, wh...

Editor's note: Mike Ashland loved running. But after he moved from the San Francisco Bay Area to Oregon, and began working on a home renovation with his partner, he found himself more and more exhausted. Medical tests revealed that without his knowledge, he had suffered a massive heart attack that destroyed nearly half of his heart muscle. Within a month, Ashland went from being a marathon runner ...

Want to know how to avoid heart trouble? You can start by asking a nurse. Or, better yet, about 84,000 nurses. A 14-year study of 84,129 nurses -- published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2000 -- provides a blueprint for protecting the heart. You don't have to be a medical professional to follow it, either. No matter your age, your gender, or your past lifestyle, now's the time to start...

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