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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Heart Attack".

Health News Results - 792

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Are new medicines for people with out-of-control cholesterol wildly overpriced? It's a question that's sparking debate among consumers and providers of care.

Now, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) report that the price of these drugs -- called PCSK9 inhibitors -- would have to be slashed by a whopping 71 percen...

THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Five years after heart bypass surgery, patients whose operation was done using a heart-lung pump lived longer than those whose surgeons didn't use the device, a new study finds.

Since the 1990s, two different approaches have been commonly used by heart surgeons to perform coronary artery bypass graft operations. Coronary artery bypass creat...

TUESDAY, Aug. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As if people newly diagnosed with cancer don't have enough to worry about, a new study suggests the diagnosis may put their hearts at risk, too.

The study found that newly diagnosed cancer patients are at increased risk for a condition called arterial thromboembolism, which occurs when blood flow is blocked by a clot that's traveled from anot...

MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- No amount of extra weight is good for your heart, no matter how fit you are by other measures, new British research shows.

"Our findings suggest that if a patient is overweight or obese, all efforts should be made to help them get back to a healthy weight, regardless of other factors," said study co-author Camille Lassale, from Imperial Colleg...

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than half of U.S. stroke survivors are prescribed cholesterol-lowering statins, a new study finds.

Statins are recommended for patients who have had an ischemic stroke or mini-stroke (transient ischemic attack) to reduce their risk for a repeat stroke or other cardiovascular events, according to the American Heart Association. Ischemic...

TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hands-only CPR training is now available at kiosks in three more major U.S. airports, bringing the total number to seven.

The three airports are Cleveland Hopkins International, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International, and Orlando International, according to the American Heart Association (AHA).

Since 2016, more than 20,000 visit...

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For many adults, weight gain is slow and steady, but new research suggests that even a few extra pounds can boost your risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

"People don't become obese overnight," said study lead author Dr. Frank Hu. He's a professor in the departments of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvar...

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Under Obamacare, efforts were made to cut the number of times patients needed to head back to the hospital after discharge. But would a reduction in these "readmissions" leave patients more vulnerable at home, raising death rates?

A new study suggests that didn't happen. Reducing hospital readmission rates for heart attack, heart failure an...

MONDAY, July 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For years, the mantra has been that eating lots of fruits, vegetables and grains will ward off heart disease, but a new study suggests that choosing the wrong ones may backfire.

The study, of over 200,000 U.S. health professionals, found those who ate plenty of healthy plant foods -- such as vegetables, beans and whole grains -- did have a lo...

FRIDAY, July 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Times of high stress -- Mondays and winter holidays -- seem to be especially hard on the heart, according to new research that suggests these periods are when heart attacks are most likely to occur.

On the flip side, heart attacks are least likely to occur when you're chilling out on the weekend or your summer vacation, the study found.

...

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new CT scan analysis may allow doctors to identify blood vessel inflammation before heart problems actually crop up, researchers report.

Detecting inflammation before it hardens into irreversible plaque could potentially help cardiologists prevent heart attacks, the scientists said.

"Currently, CT only tells you whether there ar...

WEDNESDAY, July 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, yet it receives much less government funding for research than other leading causes of death, researchers report.

Adjusted for inflation, U.S. National Institutes of Health funding for cardiac arrest research fell from $35.4 million in 2007 to $28.5 million in 2016, th...

TUESDAY, July 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Using a breathing device to treat sleep apnea may help you get a good night's rest, but it might not lower your risk of dying from a stroke or heart condition, a new analysis suggests.

Looking at data from 10 clinical trials, researchers found that apnea patients' risk of cardiovascular-related death remained the same whether or not they used...

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's worked wonders for men battling erectile dysfunction, and now early research suggests that Viagra -- when added to artery-opening stents -- might cut a patient's odds for clots.

Stents are tiny mesh tubes surgically inserted to prop up failing blood vessels. But as South Korean researchers explained, these devices can become less effectiv...

MONDAY, July 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Black adults are more likely than whites to die of a first heart attack, a new analysis suggests.

Two out of three major heart studies reviewed, involving more than 28,000 people, found black men between the ages of 45 and 64 were twice as likely to die of a first heart attack as white men. Older blacks were also more likely than whites to die...

TUESDAY, July 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Shingles may be tied to an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

About one-third of Americans will develop shingles in their lifetime. The painful skin rash can occur in anyone who's had chickenpox, and the risk increases with age.

The new study looked at 2003-2013 medical records for mor...

WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A dramatic decrease in often-fatal cardiac arrest has occurred among Oregon residents who gained access to health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports.

Cardiac arrest cases declined by 17 percent among 45- to 64-year-olds soon after full implementation of the health care legislation in 2014, the researchers reporte...

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you have heart disease, unrelenting stress might hasten your death, researchers report.

Adults who suffered from persistent mental distress, including depression and anxiety, were nearly four times more likely to die from heart disease and almost three times more likely to die from any cause compared to stress-free folks, New Zealand resea...

MONDAY, June 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If your heart stops suddenly while you're on the job, would your co-workers be able to help?

Don't bet your life on it.

Two American Heart Association (AHA) surveys find most American workers are untrained in CPR and first aid. Half have no idea where to find a defibrillator to deliver a shock to try to restore normal heart rhythm to...

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genes linked to heart disease may also improve your chances of having children, a new study suggests.

Australian researchers said the findings seem to offer a potential explanation for why evolution has allowed these genes to persist for centuries.

While lifestyle is clearly important in heart disease risk, scientists have ...

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease is the leading killer of U.S. women, but many women and their doctors don't recognize the danger.

A survey of more than 1,000 women between 25 and 60 years of age found 45 percent were unaware that heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for women in America.

Most respondents said they had had a checkup in the past...

THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of nonsmoking cancer survivors exposed to secondhand smoke is down significantly in the United States, but it's too soon to breathe easy.

A new review of federal data on nearly 700 nonsmoking adult cancer survivors found 15.7 percent reporting exposure to secondhand smoke in 2011-2012, down from nearly 40 percent in 1999-2000.

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past few decades, death rates linked to cancer and heart disease have declined in most developed nations, thanks to more effective prevention strategies, early detection and greater access to quality health care.

But the same isn't true for poorer counties where the number of people dying from cancer has either remained unchanged o...

WEDNESDAY, June 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women who breast-feed their babies may have a slightly lower risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke decades later, a large new study suggests.

Researchers found that among nearly 290,000 women in China, those who breast-fed were 10 percent less likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke later in life, versus women who bottle-fed their ba...

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Someday, could controlling your cholesterol be as simple as a getting a vaccination?

That's the promise of new research in mice that suggests a vaccine might help fight cholesterol buildup in the arteries.

Everyone involved stressed that the research is in its infancy, and good results from animal trials often fail to repeat in peop...

TUESDAY, June 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Autopsy results reveal that a cocktail of illicit drugs was in actress Carrie Fisher's system after her death on Dec. 27, but it remains unclear what role they may have played in her death.

The autopsy report released Monday says Fisher, who died at 60, may have taken cocaine on Dec. 20, three days before she became ill on a Dec. 23 flight fr...

MONDAY, June 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart problems should receive personalized education to help them manage their conditions, according to a new American Heart Association (AHA) scientific statement.

The AHA also called for a multi-pronged approach and recommended that health information be tailored to a patient's ability to understand it.

"As hospital s...

TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drones have been proposed for some pretty mundane uses, such as delivering pizzas or packages, but new research suggests the high-flying machines could be used to swoop in and save lives.

Swedish researchers think drones can quickly deliver defibrillators to someone whose heart has suddenly stopped beating.

"Each minute that pass...

MONDAY, June 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- How far people go in school seems to be linked to their odds for heart disease, new research suggests.

A team led by Dr. Yasuhiko Kubota, of the University of Minnesota, tracked data from nearly 14,000 white and black Americans, followed from 1987 through 2013.

For men, the risk of cardiovascular disease -- coronary heart disease, h...

MONDAY, May 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Methamphetamine users who quit the drug may get a break: New research suggests it's possible to reverse heart damage with proper medical treatment.

Research has previously linked meth use to heart problems that can contribute to death. But it hadn't been clear if stopping the drug use resulted in better heart health...

WEDNESDAY, May 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting less than six hours of sleep a night may double the odds of dying from heart disease or stroke for people who already have risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, new research suggests.

Known as metabolic syndrome, this cluster of risk factors can include high blood pressure, high levels of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, high blood su...

TUESDAY, May 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's delicious news for chocolate lovers: New research suggests the sweet might help keep a common and dangerous form of irregular heartbeat at bay.

The study of more than 55,000 people in Denmark found that those who favored chocolate tended to have a lower risk of atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat that raises stroke risk.

...

WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly a third of all deaths around the world are the result of heart disease and stroke, making cardiovascular disease the number one killer globally, new research finds.

Big declines in heart disease-driven fatalities in countries such as the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea and many countries in Western Europe have st...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of heart attack increases sharply after a respiratory infection, a new study finds.

But the absolute risk that any one episode will cause a heart attack is low, the Australian researchers added.

The researchers looked at 578 people who suffered a heart attack and found that 17 percent had experienced symptoms of respiratory ...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Actress Angela Bassett has graced film and TV screens with a wide range of award-winning performances for decades.

But her latest role is that of spokeswoman, raising awareness of links between type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Unfortunately, it's an issue Bassett understands only too well.

"I got involved with this moveme...

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The county you call home may have a lot to do with your chances of dying from heart disease or stroke, a new U.S. study reveals.

Although deaths from cardiovascular disease have been dropping overall for the past 35 years in the United States, there are still pockets across the country where these death rates are unusually high, the researcher...

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Combat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have a stepped-up "fight or flight" response, which researchers say may explain why PTSD boosts the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease.

PTSD can occur among civilians but is nearly twice as widespread in the military.

Previous research had shown that veterans' "figh...

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Energy drinks can be deadly for people with a certain genetic heart condition, a small study warns.

Called long QT syndrome (LQTS), the condition affects 1 in 2,000 people and can cause a rapid, irregular heartbeat that can sometimes be fatal.

"The potential cardiovascular risk of energy drinks continues to emerge as an important publ...

WEDNESDAY, May 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Sizable numbers of adults with risk factors for heart attack -- such as smoking, obesity or physical inactivity -- aren't inclined to do anything to improve their health, a large, new study finds.

Among those at greatest risk, meaning they having five or more risk factors, almost 1 in 5 did not feel they needed to make any changes, the study...

TUESDAY, May 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have heart valve surgery get better results and are more likely to survive if their surgeon does a lot of the operations, a new study.

Researchers from Mount Sinai Health System in New York City studied New York state data on patients who had a type of heart operation called mitral valve surgery between 2002 and 2013.

Da...

MONDAY, May 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It may not come as a surprise, but a new study suggests that people who reach middle age in good heart health can look forward to a longer, healthier life.

The findings were culled from an analysis that followed nearly 26,000 U.S. adults for 40 years.

The investigators found that people in optimal heart health in middle age lived an av...

TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A highly sensitive blood test can identify patients with a raised risk of death in the month after surgery, a large study suggests.

On average, 1 percent of patients die within 30 days after noncardiac surgery -- most from a heart attack, said researcher Dr. P.J. Devereaux, a professor at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada.

T...

MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors -- even in those who are obese, according to a new study.

"The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-risk group of individuals with excess weight," stud...

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When brain cells are starved of oxygen, people and all other mammals run out of energy and begin to die.

Not so for a hairless, underground rodent called the naked mole-rat. It survives low-oxygen conditions because its brain cells switch from using glucose as fuel to fructose -- a process that is typically found in plants, not animals.

...

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Air quality in the United States is improving overall, but not enough for the nearly 40 percent of Americans who live in counties with unhealthy levels of air pollution.

That's the conclusion of the American Lung Association's annual report, which shows that 125 million Americans were exposed to high levels of either ozone or particle poll...

WEDNESDAY, April 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High doses of powerful statin drugs have been shown to avert future heart problems, including heart attack and stroke. Yet many heart attack patients stop taking these medicines as recommended, a new study reveals.

Researchers examined data for heart attack patients who had a prescription for a "high-intensity" statin filled within 30 days...

TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicting guidelines on statin use could leave about 9 million Americans unsure about treatment, a new study suggests.

Researchers estimate that if all doctors followed the latest guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for the cholesterol-lowering drugs, the number of Americans aged 40 to 75 on statin medications ...

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney disease is a major cause of heart-related deaths worldwide, a new study reports.

Based on data from 188 countries at six time points between 1990 and 2013, the researchers estimated that in 2013, reduced kidney function was associated with 4 percent of deaths worldwide, or 2.2 million deaths.

More than half of these deaths ...

THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hot flashes may be more than a troublesome nuisance for some women during menopause -- they may be a signal for increased risk of heart disease, new research suggests.

Researchers tracked the health of 272 nonsmoking women, aged 40 to 60. Among women between 40 and 53 years of age, frequent hot flashes were linked to poorer function in bloo...

WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When a marathon shuts down city streets, it's more than an inconvenience: Nearby residents appear more likely to die from heart attack and cardiac arrest, a new study finds.

The study, of 11 U.S. cities, found that older residents were less likely to survive the heart events on marathon days, compared to other days, perhaps due to delays i...

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Wellness Library Results - 8

A heart attack, like any other brush with death, can unleash intense waves of emotion. Many survivors feel scared and nervous, even though they're grateful to be alive. And unfortunately, many also slip into depression. Though feeling bleak may seem like a perfectly natural reaction to heart trouble, depression shouldn't be taken lightly. Left untreated, the condition can sap a heart patient's str...

The irony was as inescapable as the smoke. Here was Taku Ronsman choking on secondhand smoke at work every day in a city health department, where she gave advice on how to create a smoke-free workplace. Hard at work for the Brown County Tobacco-Free Coalition in Green Bay, Wisconsin, she developed chronic bronchitis from the cigarette smoke down the hall. The building -- which also housed the Ame...

We all owe our lives to the arteries that carry oxygen-rich blood from our lungs to our heart. If one of those arteries becomes blocked, part of the heart will begin to die. Doctors call this sudden blockage an "acute myocardial infarction," but it's also known as a heart attack. The pain of the attack itself may last for minutes or hours, but the roots of the problem often stretch back several d...

What is angina pectoris? Angina is temporary pain or discomfort in the chest that occurs when not enough oxygen-carrying blood reaches your heart muscle. (The term "angina" means "pain," while "pectoris" refers to the chest.) Sometimes angina feels like heartburn, the similar sensations you may get after eating a heavy meal. But if you feel this pain regularly, it may be a symptom of heart diseas...

"Driving that train/high on cocaine
Casey Jones, you better watch your speed ...
Come 'round the bend, you know it's the end
The fireman screams and the engine just gleams ..." -- The Grateful Dead Nearly four decades after the Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia wrote the lyrics to "Casey Jones," the drug that inspired the song is enjoying a resurgence. More than 35 million Americans 12 y...

It happened so fast. Sharon Brooks, co-owner of the trendy but now-defunct Hamburger Mary's restaurant in San Francisco, was ringing out the cash register and trying to reach her son's girlfriend on the phone. But when the young woman answered, all that came out of Brooks' mouth was gibberish. "I tried to talk and couldn't. I went into the bathroom and felt my left side tingling," says Brooks, wh...

Editor's note: Mike Ashland loved running. But after he moved from the San Francisco Bay Area to Oregon, and began working on a home renovation with his partner, he found himself more and more exhausted. Medical tests revealed that without his knowledge, he had suffered a massive heart attack that destroyed nearly half of his heart muscle. Within a month, Ashland went from being a marathon runner ...

Want to know how to avoid heart trouble? You can start by asking a nurse. Or, better yet, about 84,000 nurses. A 14-year study of 84,129 nurses -- published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2000 -- provides a blueprint for protecting the heart. You don't have to be a medical professional to follow it, either. No matter your age, your gender, or your past lifestyle, now's the time to start...

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