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23 Aug

Migraine Medications

High-quality medications for migraine headaches are being underused, according to a new study

22 Aug

Infant Sleep Position Challenges

Less than half of parents exclusively follow safe sleep recommendations for infants, study finds

21 Aug

The Mammography Age Debate

Annual mammography screenings starting at 40 may save more lives, study finds

Do Fewer Nightly Dreams Mean Higher Dementia Risk in Seniors?

Do Fewer Nightly Dreams Mean Higher Dementia Risk in Seniors?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who spend less time each night in the dream stage of sleep may be more likely to succumb to dementia as they age, new research suggests.

Known as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, this critical phase "occurs in intervals throughout the night, and is characterized by more dreaming and r...

How Safe Is Your Drinking Water? Take a Look

How Safe Is Your Drinking Water? Take a Look

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Even if local health officials say it's safe, cloudy drinking water may have the potential to cause vomiting and diarrhea, a new research review finds.

Researchers looked at past North American and European studies exploring the link between water cloudiness, or turbidity, and tummy troubles...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 23, 2017
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'Exoskeletons' May Help Kids With Cerebral Palsy Walk

'Exoskeletons' May Help Kids With Cerebral Palsy Walk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A robotic exoskeleton attached to the lower leg may someday help kids with cerebral palsy maintain the ability to walk.

Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder, characterized by impaired motor function and muscle control. By adulthood, half of those with cerebral palsy no longer walk, often b...

Confederate Submarine Crew Killed by Blast From Their Own Torpedo

Confederate Submarine Crew Killed by Blast From Their Own Torpedo

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For more than 150 years, how eight crew members of a Confederate submarine dubbed the H.L. Hunley died during an attack on a Union warship has remained a mystery.

Until now.

Using a six-foot replica of the submarine to analyze the effect of underwater explosions, researchers report...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 23, 2017
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Early Rotator Cuff Surgery Helps Return to Activity

Early Rotator Cuff Surgery Helps Return to Activity

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Early surgery to fix tears in a shoulder rotator cuff muscle is a good idea because it improves strength, function and other outcomes in the long term, a new study from France finds.

Researchers also believe this kind of repair can prevent the rotator cuff muscle from deteriorating.

...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 23, 2017
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Steroid Pills Usually Ineffective Against Bronchitis, Study Finds

Steroid Pills Usually Ineffective Against Bronchitis, Study Finds

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors sometimes prescribe a steroid for patients with bronchitis or other troublesome chest infections, but a new British study says the approach isn't warranted.

"Our study does not support the continued use of steroids as they do not have a clinically useful effect on symptom duration o...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • August 23, 2017
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Does Autism Risk Reside in Cells' Energy Engines?

Does Autism Risk Reside in Cells' Energy Engines?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Mitochondria, the power plants of human cells, may play a significant role in autism risk, new research suggests.

Not only that, ancient human migration patterns may have predisposed some groups to a greater risk for the developmental disorder, the scientists added.

"Our findings s...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • August 23, 2017
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Cutting Carbs and Calories at Lunch

Cutting Carbs and Calories at Lunch

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The choices you make during your lunch hour can make -- or break -- your "bottom" line. Picking smart carb and calorie options will help keep your weight loss efforts on track.

First, ditch the soda. It contains a lot of sugar without providing any nutrients, says Rachel Begun, a registered ...

  • Regina Boyle Wheeler
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  • August 23, 2017
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Longer Prescriptions Make Opioid Abuse More Likely: Study

Longer Prescriptions Make Opioid Abuse More Likely: Study

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A short-term painkiller prescription is less likely to lead to opioid use disorder than a longer supply of pain pills, a new study suggests.

"Compared to someone prescribed two days versus seven days, that person with a seven-day supply is twice as likely to be using opioids in the long term,"...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 23, 2017
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Doctor-Patient Dialogue May Boost Use of Blood Pressure Drugs

Doctor-Patient Dialogue May Boost Use of Blood Pressure Drugs

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors can help boost use of high blood pressure medications by their poor patients simply by talking to them, a new study suggests.

Many people fail to take their blood pressure-lowering drugs, putting them at higher risk of heart attack and stroke, the American Heart Association says.

...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 22, 2017
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More Evidence Contact Sports Can Affect the Brain

More Evidence Contact Sports Can Affect the Brain

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Playing contact sports like football or ice hockey can alter the structure and function of the brain, Canadian researchers report.

Brain scans showed that these changes were particularly pronounced in sports that have the greatest risk of body contact.

"There is growing concern about...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • August 22, 2017
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Could Common Vitamin Supplements Raise Lung Cancer Risk?

Could Common Vitamin Supplements Raise Lung Cancer Risk?

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Men, and especially male smokers, appear to be more likely to develop lung cancer if they take high doses of vitamins B6 and B12, new research suggests.

For men taking these vitamin supplements, the risk of lung cancer was nearly doubled. For men who smoked, the risk was between three and four...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 22, 2017
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New Cholesterol Drugs Vastly Overpriced, Study Contends

New Cholesterol Drugs Vastly Overpriced, Study Contends

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Are new medicines for people with out-of-control cholesterol wildly overpriced? It's a question that's sparking debate among consumers and providers of care.

Now, researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) report that the price of these drugs -- called PCSK9 inhibitors -...

  • Karen Pallarito
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  • August 22, 2017
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Did You Damage Your Eyes Viewing the Eclipse?

Did You Damage Your Eyes Viewing the Eclipse?

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Millions across America watched the total or partial solar eclipse on Monday, but not everyone heeded eye-safety advice.

"After the solar eclipse, we have already seen dozens of patients with concerns ranging from headaches to subjective blurry vision," noted Dr. Avnish Deobhakta. He's an opht...

Many Prescribed Opioids Even After Overdose

Many Prescribed Opioids Even After Overdose

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After treatment for an opioid overdose, many Medicaid patients continue to receive prescriptions for the same type of drugs that nearly killed them, researchers say.

Moreover, few overdose patients are prescribed anti-addiction medications after hospital discharge, the University of Pittsburgh...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • August 22, 2017
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Dementia Care: A Huge Financial Burden for U.S. Families

Dementia Care: A Huge Financial Burden for U.S. Families

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Caring for a family member with a neurological disorder such as dementia is vastly more expensive than caring for a senior who is dementia-free, a new study finds.

The average yearly cost of caring for a dementia-free senior is roughly $137,000. But the price tag rises to $321,000 for care of ...

Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears

Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers -- typically unpaid family members -- report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates.

The research used a nationally representative sample of about 2,400 older adults in the United States. The study...

  • Maureen Salamon
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  • August 22, 2017
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He Complains She Shops Too Much -- And Marriage Suffers

He Complains She Shops Too Much -- And Marriage Suffers

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- It's sometimes a case of "till shopping do us part."

According to new research, if you think your spouse is a spendthrift, it may hurt your marriage -- whether it's true or not.

The researchers found that husbands were most likely to develop a spousal conflict over money if they thou...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 22, 2017
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Close Friendships in High School Make for Happier Adults

Close Friendships in High School Make for Happier Adults

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you're not one of the popular kids with dozens of "besties," you can take solace in new research that suggests having close friendships is better for your adult mental health than having many friends in high school.

"Our research found that the quality of friendships during adolescence may ...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • August 22, 2017
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Meditation's Soothing Effects

Meditation's Soothing Effects

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Meditation has been embraced by cultures around the world for thousands of years.

Many people meditate for mental wellness, to relieve stress and become more calm and relaxed.

According to the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, there's evidence that practi...

  • Joan McClusky
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  • August 22, 2017
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