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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

22 Feb

Breast Cancer and Lifestyle Changes

Physical activity may be the most important lifestyle factor in reducing breast cancer recurrence and death, study finds.

21 Feb

Quality of Melatonin Products

Melatonin content of supplements may not be as advertised, study finds.

17 Feb

Your Relationship Status and Your Health

Are married, single or divorced people less stressed out?

MRIs Can Be Safe for People With Heart Devices …

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with pacemakers or implantable defibrillators have long been told they can't undergo MRI scans. But a new study suggests that it can be safely done -- under the right conditions.

The study, published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, focused on patien...

For Stroke Survivors, Exercise Is Good for the Brain: Review

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A structured exercise program can help stroke survivors recover not only physically but mentally as well, a new review says.

The analysis of 13 clinical trials found that exercise therapy was generally good for stroke patients' "cognition."

Cognition refers to vital mental processe...

Little Weight Gain in Pregnancy Tied to Schizophrenia Risk in Kids: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gaining too little weight during pregnancy may increase the odds that a child will develop schizophrenia later in life, Swedish researchers suggest.

Past research has shown that pregnant women in areas of famine are more likely to have children who suffer from mental disorders, including sch...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 22, 2017
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Unhealthy in Middle Age, Dementia in Old Age?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men and women at risk for heart disease may also face a higher chance of dementia later in life, a new study suggests.

Risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes might boost the odds of dementia almost as much as carrying the gene that raises the risk of Alzh...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 22, 2017
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Is Need for More Sleep a Sign of Pending Dementia?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who begin sleeping more than nine hours a night may face a higher risk of dementia down the road, a new study suggests.

The researchers estimated that the risk of dementia grew by almost 2.5 times for those who found themselves recently needing extra sleep. The chances of dementia ro...

  • Randy Dotinga
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  • February 22, 2017
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Race May Play Role in Recurrent Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Strokes bring with them a heightened possibility of another attack, and new research suggests black patients may be at especially high risk for recurrence.

The risk of recurrent stroke was up to 50 percent higher in black seniors who'd survived a stroke compared to their white peers, accord...

Headaches Often Strike Before Strokes in Kids: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children are much more likely than adults to have a headache before an ischemic stroke, new research suggests.

An ischemic stroke is caused by a blocked blood vessel in the brain.

"Stroke should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child with a headache and additional sympt...

Bleeding Strokes Take Heavy Toll on Brain

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of the most deadly type of stroke face a higher risk for developing depression and dementia, new research suggests.

Often called "bleeding strokes," hemorrhagic strokes occur when a blood vessel ruptures and leaks blood into the brain. Conversely, the more common ischemic stroke ha...

Head Position Just After Stroke Doesn't Affect Recovery: Study

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The way a patient's head is positioned by health care professionals right after a stroke doesn't seem to have any bearing on how well he or she will fare, new research indicates.

The finding stems from an analysis of more than 11,000 patients from 114 hospitals in nine countries.

T...

Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and a new mouse study could help explain why that occurs -- and how the virus might damage male fertility.

In lab research, Zika attacked the testicles of mice, targeting cells that produce the male hormone testosterone and ultimately cau...

  • Dennis Thompson
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  • February 22, 2017
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'Off-Label' Antidepressants Common, But Where's the Evidence?

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors often prescribe antidepressants to tackle conditions like migraine headaches for which they aren't technically approved. Now, researchers say such "off-label" usage mostly occurs without clear scientific evidence backing up the treatments.

A new Canadian study found that almost one-t...

ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As kids play sports like soccer and football with more frequency and force, many are damaging their knees, a new study finds.

A common knee injury -- an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear -- has steadily increased among 6- to 18-year-olds in the United States, rising more than 2 percent ...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • February 22, 2017
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After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is always a danger for people recovering from a debilitating stroke. But new research suggests that tweaking a rehabilitation facility's lighting system may help patients keep depression at bay.

Specifically, the Danish study of stroke rehab patients found they were less prone to ...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • February 22, 2017
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Spoiler Alert! Most People Don't Want to Know the Future

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Even if it were possible, most people wouldn't want a crystal ball to foresee the future, instead preferring to be kept in the dark, a new study contends.

And even if the future holds good surprises, the majority of people still don't want to know what's going to happen ahead of time, the re...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • February 22, 2017
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U.S. Life Expectancy May Rise to Over 80 by 2030

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- By 2030, American women will live an average of more than 83 years, while men may reach an average of 80, a new study estimates.

These figures are up just slightly from current 2010 estimates. Right now, American women live to an average of 81, while men live to an average of 77.

But...

No, Your Cat Isn't a Threat to Your Mental Health

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Cat owners can breathe a sigh of relief: Your feline's litter box likely won't put your family's mental health at risk.

New British research challenges earlier beliefs that parasites in cat droppings might be linked to schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder an...

  • Mary Elizabeth Dallas
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  • February 22, 2017
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Scientists Shed Light on Possible Cause of Nearsightedness

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Whether you're nearsighted or not might come down to one particular type of cell in your retina, a new mouse study suggests.

Researchers from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago report that this cell is highly sensitive to light and controls how the eye develops.

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 21, 2017
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Loneliness Often Plagues Black Women at Risk for Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease can be a heavy burden for anyone. But new research suggests that black women at risk for the illness are also more prone to loneliness and money worries than their white peers.

That's important, researchers said, because there's evidence that loneliness can raise risks of heart d...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 21, 2017
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Learning Issues Common in Kids With Heart Defects: Study

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Children born with heart defects seem to be at increased risk of learning problems in elementary school, a new study suggests.

And those with less severe heart abnormalities may not receive needed assistance, the study of third graders from North Carolina found.

Among more than 9,000...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • February 21, 2017
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After Wives Suffer Stroke, Husbands Adapt to Caregiving Role

TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Being thrust into the role of caring for a spouse or partner who's had a stroke can be terribly unsettling. But in a small study, men reported more successes than problems in their first year of caregiving.

A majority of men in the study (54 percent) worked full-time while caring for their spo...

  • Karen Pallarito
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  • February 21, 2017
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